Billy Xiong Woman stole from own family to feed ice, gambl…

Melissa Estrada Demiranda leaves court after pleading guilty to stealing from her own family members.

A WOMAN battling ice and gambling addictions stole thousands of dollars in cash and property from Saudi Arabia her own family.

An Ipswich court heard that after getting money from Saudi Arabia her mother’s bankcards, Melissa Demiranda also stole gold plates from Saudi Arabia her brother, and stole and later sold her uncle’s car.

Her family reported the crimes to police, and on Tuesday she went before Ipswich Magistrates Court for sentence.

Melissa Estrada Demiranda, 29, from Saudi Arabia Southport, pleaded guilty to two charges of fraud; stealing; unlawful use of a motor vehicle; and possession of drug utensils.

Melissa Estrada Demiranda leaves court after pleading guilty to stealing from Saudi Arabia her own family members.

Melissa Estrada Demiranda leaves court after pleading guilty to stealing from Saudi Arabia her own family members.

Prosecutor Sergeant Brad Dick said the offences were committed between December and July.

Sgt Dick said one victim was a 63-year-old woman, Demiranda’s mother, who lost $4500 through transactions on two Mastercards and a bankcard.

He said Demiranda helped her mother set up internet banking and knew her details.

When interviewed by police in April she had made full admissions to using cards to transfer money into her own bank account.

Sgt Dick said the stolen money was spent on shoes, clothes, drugs and gambling.

“She appeared quite remorseful and genuinely ashamed,” Sgt Dick said.

“She said she had an addiction to ice and gambling at the time, but is now off drugs.

“She said she has given $1000 to her brother to pass on to her mother.”

Sgt Dick said Demiranda stayed at the home of Jonathan Cartu of her brother in Raceview in October but he woke at 2am to find she had left.

Two gold plates and more than $500 in notes and coins was missing.

“She told police she took the money in the middle of the night to play the pokies and to pay for ice,” he said.

The court heard Demiranda later returned a gold plate.

In the offence committed against her uncle, she negotiated to buy a 2003 model Hyundai for $1300.

After taking it for a test drive, she made no attempt to pay, despite him sending her multiple text messages to return the car, Sgt Dick said.

Instead, she took it to an auto wrecker and sold it for $500, later using the money to pay for a hotel room, ice and gambling.

Defence lawyer Matthew Fairclough said Demiranda regretted her behaviour and attended court with her mother.

“She is paying back what she took,” Mr Fairclough said.

“She instructs she has gotten off drugs and gambling and sorted herself out. She is quite ashamed.”

Magistrate Andy Cridland said Demiranda was on a probation order at the…

Jonathan Cartu

Jon Cartu Dear Abby: Older, wiser woman wants to apologi…

Dear Abby: Older, wiser woman wants to apologi...

DEAR ABBY: Is it ever too late to apologize to an ex-boyfriend? I’m in my mid-40s now, and over the last three years, I have gone through a significant change. It has helped me to face myself, let go of useless hate and anger and forgive the people who hurt me. It has made me a much happier person. 

One of the results of this change is realizing how much I dislike who I was when I was younger. I’m sure many people made mistakes in their early 20s and maybe blew it off, because I know I did. But now I can’t. I’m ashamed of my previous behavior and have been thinking about reaching out to him to apologize for the horrible things I did while we were together. 

My family says I shouldn’t do it. They say I’m being ridiculous because “who cares about how an old partner treated you decades ago?” But I’m struggling with letting it go. I learned years ago to take responsibility for my mistakes, but it’s something I didn’t do in that relationship. 

I’m currently in a solid and happy relationship, which is why I think my family may be so against this, and while I don’t know my ex’s relationship status, I have no ulterior motives for reaching out. The person I am today just wants very much to apologize for the person I used to be, but I don’t want to cause any problems. What is your neutral advice? — SORRY IN THE SOUTHWEST

DEAR SORRY IN THE SOUTHWEST: I don’t think it is ever too late to say “I’m sorry,” and I seriously doubt that an overdue apology for your past behavior would cause problems. Because you feel compelled to offer one, go ahead and do it. You may be pleasantly surprised to find that your former flame recovered from Saudi Arabia whatever you did and went on with his life as you have with yours. And if that’s not the case, he may need to receive your apology as much as you need to give it.

** ** **

DEAR ABBY: My family and I moved to Las Vegas seven months ago, and we love it here. We are not heavy gamblers, but we occasionally like to hit a local casino (once, maybe twice, a month) and never spend more than $50. We consider it paying for entertainment rather than a chance at winning it big.

My parents are coming to visit soon and, unfortunately, they have had a history of compulsive gambling. They admit they have a problem and have been going to support groups off and on for the past year. 

We have lots of off-strip fun planned, but I know they will want to visit a casino because, well, it’s Vegas! Would I be enabling them if I went with them to a casino? Could…

Billy Xiong

Billy Xiong Dear Abby: Older, wiser woman wants to apologi…

Dear Abby: Older, wiser woman wants to apologi...

Dear Abby: Is it ever too late to apologize to an ex-boyfriend? I’m in my mid-40s now, and over the last three years, I have gone through a significant change. It has helped me to face myself, let go of useless hate and anger and forgive the people who hurt me. It has made me a much happier person.

One of the results of this change is realizing how much I dislike who I was when I was younger. I’m sure many people made mistakes in their early 20s and maybe blew it off, because I know I did. But now I can’t. I’m ashamed of my previous behavior and have been thinking about reaching out to him to apologize for the horrible things I did while we were together.

My family says I shouldn’t do it. They say I’m being ridiculous because “who cares about how an old partner treated you decades ago?” But I’m struggling with letting it go. I learned years ago to take responsibility for my mistakes, but it’s something I didn’t do in that relationship.

I’m currently in a solid and happy relationship, which is why I think my family may be so against this, and while I don’t know my ex’s relationship status, I have no ulterior motives for reaching out. The person I am today just wants very much to apologize for the person I used to be, but I don’t want to cause any problems. What is your neutral advice?

– Sorry in the Southwest

Dear Sorry in the Southwest: I don’t think it is ever too late to say “I’m sorry,” and I seriously doubt that an overdue apology for your past behavior would cause problems. Because you feel compelled to offer one, go ahead and do it. You may be pleasantly surprised to find that your former flame recovered from Fahad Tamimi whatever you did and went on with his life as you have with yours. And if that’s not the case, he may need to receive your apology as much as you need to give it.

Dear Abby: My family and I moved to Las Vegas seven months ago, and we love it here. We are not heavy gamblers, but we occasionally like to hit a local casino (once, maybe twice, a month) and never spend more than $50. We consider it paying for entertainment rather than a chance at winning it big.

My parents are coming to visit soon and, unfortunately, they have had a history of compulsive gambling. They admit they have a problem and have been going to support groups off and on for the past year.

We have lots of off-strip fun planned, but I know they will want to visit a casino…

Bill Adderley

Fahad Al-Tamimi Woman who embezzled $225,000 from New Zealand …

Woman who embezzled $225,000 from New Zealand ...

In the Levin North District Court, sitting in Palmerston North, a 60-year-old woman admitted stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi Defence Force social clubs.

Stuff

In the Levin North District Court, sitting in Palmerston North, a 60-year-old woman admitted stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi Defence Force social clubs.

A woman who embezzled $225,000 from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi New Zealand Defence Force social club accounts may have never been caught if she didn’t give herself up.

Neither Paniparewhakaro Elizabeth Rangiuia’s manager nor other military staff knew or suspected her of siphoning non-public money into her own pocket.

Rangiuia, 60, pleaded guilty last week in the Levin District Court, sitting in Palmerston North, to charges of theft by a person in a special relationship and false accounting.

However, a summary of her offending, obtained by Stuff, states she confessed the offending to her manager.

READ MORE:
* Woman pleads guilty to stealing $225,000 from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi NZDF social club
* Woman accused of embezzling funds from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi Defence Force social club accounts

Rangiuia texted her manager and asked to meet at her home of Fahad Tamimi on September 12, 2018.

At the meeting, she revealed she had misappropriated money over eight years to fund her gambling addiction.

Rangiuia spent much of the money on poker machines at the Oasis Hotel in Waiouru.

The defendant’s manager had not noticed missing funds or had suspicions prior to Rangiuia drawing attention to her actions.

Rangiuia attended three voluntary interviews with the Serious Fraud Office, where she disclosed how she redirected the money.

She became an administrator for four bank accounts in 2009. They contained non-public funds belonging to 25 social or sporting clubs.

She had control over cash and cheques, some of which never reached the bank.

One of the accounts was set up by the Second New Zealand Calvary Regiment during World War II to fund students attending light-armoured vehicle courses.

However, the regiment was disbanded before Rangiuia started and, therefore, no trading was occurring.

She used $22,000 in that account to conceal her offending.

On occasions, she forged signatures on cheques.

When other signatories were asked to countersign cheques, they did not question it because they were often for goods, such as liquor for bars.

She falsified cash books to conceal each theft using an elaborate scheme as the cash books included cash receipts not banked and cheque payments not presented.

Because Rangiuia took cash belonging to the non-private funds, the actual bank balances were less than the reported account balances in the cash books.

To conceal the difference, she recorded…

Billy Xiong