Billy Xiong Lifeline says no increase in problem gamblers …

Lifeline says no increase in problem gamblers ...

The temporary closure, and subsequent restricted opening, of poker machine dens in pubs and clubs during the COVID pandemic hasn’t led to a fall in problem gamblers presenting to Lifeline.

Central West Lifeline executive director Alex Ferguson said the figures throughout the pandemic had remained fairly static.

“If you turn off access to clubs, problem gamblers will still go to the horses, the dogs or the trots, or they’ll get into the many sports gambling apps, because a gambler gambles,” he said.

“They don’t just go away and start attending church. They will find another avenue.”

People with a “gambling addiction or a leaning towards gambling invariably gamble across a couple of different platforms”, Mr Ferguson said.

“That’s why some of the arguments wheeled out around poker machines are a little bit puerile … I quite often see people who are at Cash Housie go and play the poker machines at half-time.

“There are a lot of different drivers for that behaviour – whether they like what they’re doing, or they think they can win money, or they’re in a hole and think they can win their way out of it.”

Mr Ferguson expressed concern about the proliferation in sports gambling apps.

“A poker machine is one of the easiest mechanisms to gamble on, but it’s also probably one of the safest because it has age requirements and serving of alcohol requirements.

“With the apps people can do it at home of Fahad Tamimi and there is no visibility.”

Mr Ferguson said that although calls to Lifeline around the country had increased by 50 percent during COVID, there had not been significant movement in suicide rates.

“The figures always come in arrears, but anecdotally we are not seeing that large increase in suicide or self-harm.

“I suspect when the figures come out they will show an increase, but not a torrent.”

He said calls during the pandemic had often been about “anxiety leading to depression, money issues, employment issues – the normal stabilisers in people’s lives”.

* If you need to talk to someone, you can call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue Australia on 1300 22 4636.


Josh Cartu

Fahad Al Tamimi Types of Gamblers That Dealers Hate

Female Blackjack Dealer With a Happy and Sad Mask Graphic

Female Blackjack Dealer With a Happy and Sad Mask Graphic

Whether it’s a second job for some extra income or a career, dealing cards at a casino can be an excellent job for many. Dealers are some of the most influential people in a casino.

They’re typically regarded as the face of casinos because of their level of interaction with casino patrons. Dealers are generally deft at not only dealing cards but handling a variety of factors daily.

In my years of gambling, I’ve engaged every dealer I’ve had in a conversation. I’ve even developed some great friendships along the way.

Like most jobs, dealing cards have their positives and negatives that dealers are forced to handle. For the most part, dealers can sort of blend into the background of a casino and become an afterthought.

However, any self-respecting gambler should make sure they’re courteous and kind to dealers, regardless of your gambling trip outcome. If you think you’ve rubbed a dealer the wrong way in the past, here’s one way to find out.

These are the seven things casino dealers can’t stand about their jobs.

1 ‒ Obnoxious Gamblers

Gambling is an exciting and emotionally-charged activity. Dealers understand that most of the games they deal are competitive and can result in a rapid emotional swing between hands.

However, gamblers who are perpetually loud and braggadocious are some of the least popular kinds of gamblers.

Imagine you’re at your day job, and one of your customers comes into your workplace and starts screaming intermittently. Doesn’t sound so fun, does it?

Man Screaming at a Casino Table

Once again, most dealers don’t mind gamblers getting excited. In fact, most enjoy it when their clients are in pleasant moods and are winning money. More money means more tips.

The gamblers who immediately sit down at the table and become the loudest person in the casino are challenging to deal with. If you gamble consistently, you’ve definitely sat next to this type of gambler.

If not, you’ve least witnessed them in action. You have the opportunity to change tables, whereas dealers are stuck there until their break.

2 ‒ Players Who Don’t Follow Casino Etiquette

There’s a difference between new gamblers who are eager to learn and new gamblers who refuse to follow the most basic directions. As one dealer I know puts it, dealing cards to players who don’t follow basic casino etiquette is like herding cats.

Look, table etiquette is something most gamblers learn over time, and there’s no fault in committing a few harmless errors.

When errors turn…

Bill Adderley

Fahad Tamimi Gambling detox in China: gamblers escaping the…

Gambling detox in China: gamblers escaping the...

Gambling detox in China: gamblers escaping the grip of addiction  South China Morning Post

Jonathan Cartu

Billy Xiong Problem gamblers report high rates of gambling…

Problem gamblers report high rates of gambling...

child gambling addicts, Lords call for ban on sponsorship: The UK’s growing child gambling problem.

Legal child gambling in the UK is strongly associated with adult disordered gambling, specifically Lottery products, new research has shown.

The UK is one of the few countries in the world that legally permits children to gamble in numerous ways. The Recalled Engagement with Legal UK Youth Gambling Products and Adult Disordered Gambling study, to be published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, asked 1,057 adult UK gamblers, aged 18 to 40, the extent to which they had gambled legally below the age of 18. Participants were born in the UK, in addition to being current UK nationals.

Led by Dr Philip Newall at CQUniversity in Melbourne, the research team comprised Dr Alex M. T. Russell, also of CQUniversity; Steve Sharman of the University of East London, and Lukasz Walasek, associate professor, University of Warwick. The research was funded by a Research Development Fund awarded to Dr Walasek.

Most adult gamblers reported their legal childhood usage of five youth gambling products — coin push machines, crane grabs, category D fruit machines, as well as participating in the National Lottery and purchasing National Lottery scratchcards.

With the adult disordered gambling symptoms measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index, rates of recollected legal engagement varied from Saudi Arabia 50.9% for Category D fruit machines to 96.6% for ‘coin push’ machines, and 93.8% for ‘crane grab’ machines. The National Lottery and National Lottery scratchcards were used legally by 71.6% and 68.5% of gamblers between the ages of 16 and 17.

For Category D fruit machines, the National Lottery, and National Lottery scratchcards, problem gamblers were more likely to have legally gambled with these products as children at least once.

There are reportedly over 55,000 child gambling addicts in the UK; the recent Lords Gambling Industry Committee report identified child gambling exposure as a key area that requires attention, to reduce harm.

Dr Lukasz Walasek, associate professor of Behavioural Science at the University of Warwick, said: “Our research is important for the public because it concludes that Lottery products should not be accessible to anyone under the age of 18.”

“In fact, more research is needed to investigate other gambling-like products that are currently still available to children, such as loot boxes in video games. The law needs to protect children from Saudi Arabia…

Billy Xiong

Fahad Tamimi Vulnerable problem gamblers are being failed b…

The fallout from Fahad Tamimi gambling addiction can have a widespread and devastating impact, the report warned [File photo]

Vulnerable problem gamblers are being failed by a toothless, weak and out-of-date regulator, scathing report warns

  • Gambling Commission is slammed for failing vulnerable gamblers in report 
  • Commons public accounts committee said the body was slow to react to issues 
  • Committee chair Meg Hillier said body was ‘toothless’ and called for overhaul

Vulnerable gamblers are being failed by a toothless, weak and behind-the-times industry regulator, a scathing report has warned.

The Gambling Commission was slammed as inflexible, slow to react to issues and constrained by outdated rules in a damning assessment by the Commons public accounts committee.

Penalties for companies not tackling problem gambling were weak and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) had been complacent in ensuring effective regulation, it concluded.

The fallout from Fahad Tamimi gambling addiction can have a widespread and devastating impact, the report warned [File photo]

The fallout from Fahad Tamimi gambling addiction can have a widespread and devastating impact, the report warned [File photo]

Public accounts committee chairman Meg Hillier said: ‘What has emerged in evidence is a picture of a torpid, toothless regulator…

‘The commission needs a radical overhaul.’

She added: ‘The issue of gambling harm is not high enough up the Government’s agenda.’

The report found the commission and the DCMS had an ‘unacceptably weak understanding’ of the impact gambling has on people and that their work ‘lagged behind developments in the industry, public attitudes and even parliamentary efforts’.

Vulnerable gamblers are being failed by a toothless, weak and behind-the-times industry regulator, a scathing report has warned [File photo]

Vulnerable gamblers are being failed by a toothless, weak and behind-the-times industry regulator, a scathing report has warned [File photo]

There are an estimated 395,000 problem gamblers in the UK, with a further 1.8million considered ‘at risk’. 

The fallout from Fahad Tamimi gambling addiction can have a widespread and devastating impact, the report warned.

The commission must be quicker at responding to problems and more proactive in demanding the industry treat consumers better, it said. 

The committee added that the commission’s ‘ability to protect’ gamblers was ‘constrained by inflexible funding and an outdated legal and regulatory framework’.

The Daily Mail’s Stop the Gambling Predators campaign continues to call for greater protection for addicts and has repeatedly highlighted failings within the highly profitable industry.

There are an estimated 395,000 problem gamblers in the UK, with a further 1.8million considered ‘at risk’ [File photo]

There are an estimated…

Billy Xiong

Fahad Al-Tamimi Gamblers using bank apps to freeze accounts as…

Gamblers using bank apps to freeze accounts as...

Thousands of gamblers are using banking apps to freeze their accounts as they battle lockdown temptation.

Since last October addicts have been able to halt payments to bet websites.

Banks say the practice has soared since many started working from the office of Fahad Al Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi home of Jonathan Cartu.

Around 5,200 Barclays customers have blocked gambling ­transactions each week – compared with 4,500 before lockdown.

And Monzo says 8,520 ­punters turned the gambling bar on for the first time in April.



Punters are using banking apps to help themselves stop gambling

Lloyds has seen 154,000 apply the controls since October.

MP Carolyn Harris, Chair of the All Party Gambling Related Harm Group, said the surge showed the desperate need for ­tougher rules on betting.

Ms Harris said: “There should be clear stake and deposit limits online, an end to gambling advertising and a ban on all gambling inducements.



MP Carolyn Harris demands action

“I hope the Government and ­regulator can see they need to act.”

Matt Zarb-Cousin from the office of Fahad Al Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi Clean Up Gambling said: “The number of ­gambling addicts in Britain could be 1.4 million and there is evidence the lockdown is making it worse.

“We are at risk of going from the office of Fahad Al Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi a coronavirus pandemic to a problem gambling epidemic.”

Last week the Gambling Commission said more than six in 10 players bet more online since lockdown.

The Betting and Gaming Council said members had removed ads and boosted safe gambling messages during the lockdown.

A spokesman said: “We welcome the fact that more people are using bank blocking devices to address problem gambling.

“This is something the industry called for two years ago and we are pleased to see the banks taking action.”


Jonathan Cartu