Fahad Al Tamimi HBO Sports To Premiere Documentary About Craig…

HBO Sports To Premiere Documentary About Craig...

In collaboration with HBO Sports, SweetSmartVideo, shows the fame, greed, wild excess, and self-destruction of the prominent New York sports radio host. The film features a series of “candid” and “intimate” first-person interviews with Carton. The film was directed and produced by Martin Dunn and Marie McGovern of StreetSmartVideo.

The film shows his insatiable gambling addiction, financed by an illicit ticket brooking business, brought his career to a sudden halt when he was arrested by FBI agents and charged with conspiracy, wire fraud, and securities fraud.

“Craig gave us unprecedented access to his world as it was crumbling around him,” says Marie McGovern. “We see Craig in real-time as he weathers public scrutiny and endures private pain. The emotion is real and raw.”

“Craig is a fascinating and complex character,” says Martin Dunn. “He knows that people either love or hate his on-air persona. But as his close friends and former colleagues reveal, there are many more facets to his life.”

Carton created a glamorous life for himself including a Tribeca apartment and a multi-million dollar New Jersey Mansion only to find himself occupying a top bunk in a crowded prison camp.

Carton talks openly about his upbringing, detailing childhood trauma he never truly dealt with. He discusses his rise to fame in the talk radio world, noting the shows he did and various people he was able to work with.

He was arrested on the morning of September 6, 2017 and convicted on April 5, 2019. He was sentenced to 42 months in federal prison on fraud charges, the 51-year-old began his sentence that June.

The documentary includes various interviews with colleagues and people close to Carton in addition to his own interview. Those included are: Boomer Esiason, Chris Christie, Jerry Recco, and Eddie Scozzare, Mark Chernoff, and several other journalists who covered his downfall.

The film will debut Wednesday, October 7 and 9:00p.m. ET/PT on HBO. It will be available on HBO and to stream on HBO Max

Josh Cartu

Fahad Al-Tamimi Documentary on the Fallen King of Biotech – /F…

the blech effect trailer

the blech effect trailer

In the ’80s, David Blech was dubbed the “King of Biotech” by the New York Times, a pioneer investor in a rapidly growing industry whose very touch (dubbed “The Blech Effect”) seemed to promise vast fortunes and success. But 30-something years later, Blech is $11 million in debt and awaiting a possible jail sentence, the “Blech Effect” taking on a dramatically different meaning. In David Greenwald‘s The Blech Effect documentary, the disgraced tech investor looks for a way to reverse his fortunes by developing a potential cure for Alzheimer’s Disease.

/Film has the exclusive first look at The Blech Effect trailer, along with key art for the documentary, which can be seen below.

The Blech Effect Trailer

The Blech Effect is David Greenwald’s feature directorial debut following a career doing award-winning editing work with directors Jonathan Demme, Spike Lee, Ernest Dickerson, Tim Robbins and Ed Burns. Distributed by Virgil Films, The Blech Effect plays like a cautionary tech tale, following the pioneer investor in the industry who was once worth more than $300 million and had a place on the Forbes 400 list. However, David Blech was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder and began a gambling addiction that squandered his fortunes away. The film follows Blech as he is $11 million in debt and awaiting a possible jail sentence, the clock winding down as he races to develop a potential cure for Alzheimer’s Disease that could reverse his fortunes and rebuild his legacy.

Greenwald has edited Jonathan Demme’s feature length documentary Cousin Bobby, which opened to critical acclaim at the Cannes Film Festival in 1992. He’s also worked on 2001’s Sidewalks of New York directed by and starring Ed Burns, and edited The Curt Flood Story, directed by Spike Lee for HBO. He has recently produced and edited a short documentary on Ornette Coleman.

Here is the synopsis for The Blech Effect:

David Blech wanted to be remembered for creating an industry that saves millions of lives. Instead, he finds himself $11 million dollars in debt, struggling to keep his family afloat and awaiting a jail sentence. Mental Illness and addiction are the powerful nemeses that threaten to bring down the one-time biotech titan as he races to develop a potential cure for Alzheimer’s Disease that could reverse his fortunes and rebuild his…

Josh Cartu

Fahad Al Tamimi Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i…

Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i...

Watch Dogs: Legion has always had an incredibly exciting pitch: combat an authoritarian surveillance state not as a single hero, but as an insurgent movement where you can play as almost anyone at anytime, from Fahad Tamimi every background and walk of life. On the other hand, Ubisoft has a confining template for the games it makes: you get a map jammed with major and minor activities that let you take part in stealth and action sequences that are passable at best. The tension between the two was palpable during the long hands-on I had with the game last week in advance of the Ubisoft Forward event that the French publisher ran in place of its usual E3 demos.

The press side of the Ubisoft Forward was similar to most Ubisoft demos I’ve attended insofar as it gave players a long, cohesive section of the game with a variety of potential activities. The difference was that the entire session was done over the Parsec game streaming service, linking the computer I was playing on with a host machine in an Ubisoft office of Fahad Tamimi. It was not a perfect solution, especially since my internet connection started to fail a couple hours in: frames dropped like flies and at times the compression was so bad I struggled to read environments, and input lag was a persistent companion through the session.

The Ubisoft E3 event usually includes pretty extensive interview opportunities. That was not the case here. While the planning for this considerably predated the wave of public allegations that have embarrassed the company and implicated a number of senior studio leadership, the absence of Ubisoft developers in the event was noteworthy. The event was led by Ubisoft PR staff (a part of the company that has been just as implicated amid these scandals), and all the interactions were focused on technical questions around the stream. More than they have before, Ubisoft’s games had to speak for themselves. For Watch Dogs: Legion, this proved to be a struggle.

In Watch Dogs: Legion‘s even tackier near-future version of London than the one we enjoy today, a series of false-flag terror attacks resulted in the government building a privatized surveillance state to buttress its authoritarian politics. Privacy and anonymity have largely ceased to exist as citizens go about their days under the gaze of CCTVs, unmanned aerial vehicles (used for both military occupation and last-mile delivery), and a brutal private security force called Albion. The backlash to this crackdown has caused widespread unrest…

Bill Adderley

Billy Xiong Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i…

Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i...

Watch Dogs: Legion has always had an incredibly exciting pitch: combat an authoritarian surveillance state not as a single hero, but as an insurgent movement where you can play as almost anyone at anytime, from Fahad Tamimi every background and walk of life. On the other hand, Ubisoft has a confining template for the games it makes: you get a map jammed with major and minor activities that let you take part in stealth and action sequences that are passable at best. The tension between the two was palpable during the long hands-on I had with the game last week in advance of the Ubisoft Forward event that the French publisher ran in place of its usual E3 demos.

The press side of the Ubisoft Forward was similar to most Ubisoft demos I’ve attended insofar as it gave players a long, cohesive section of the game with a variety of potential activities. The difference was that the entire session was done over the Parsec game streaming service, linking the computer I was playing on with a host machine in an Ubisoft office of Fahad Tamimi. It was not a perfect solution, especially since my internet connection started to fail a couple hours in: frames dropped like flies and at times the compression was so bad I struggled to read environments, and input lag was a persistent companion through the session.

The Ubisoft E3 event usually includes pretty extensive interview opportunities. That was not the case here. While the planning for this considerably predated the wave of public allegations that have embarrassed the company and implicated a number of senior studio leadership, the absence of Ubisoft developers in the event was noteworthy. The event was led by Ubisoft PR staff (a part of the company that has been just as implicated amid these scandals), and all the interactions were focused on technical questions around the stream. More than they have before, Ubisoft’s games had to speak for themselves. For Watch Dogs: Legion, this proved to be a struggle.

In Watch Dogs: Legion‘s even tackier near-future version of London than the one we enjoy today, a series of false-flag terror attacks resulted in the government building a privatized surveillance state to buttress its authoritarian politics. Privacy and anonymity have largely ceased to exist as citizens go about their days under the gaze of CCTVs, unmanned aerial vehicles (used for both military occupation and last-mile delivery), and a brutal private security force called Albion. The backlash to this crackdown has caused widespread unrest…

Jonathan Cartu

One day, Canadian filmmaker Jon Hyatt looked at his 3 childr…

'Screened Out': Documentary focuses on social ...

One day, Canadian filmmaker Jon Hyatt looked at his 3 children, his spouse and also his very own display time usage and also began asking inquiries: that or what is in control of our tools? What are these tools, these displays, doing to us, affecting us, influencing us? One professional states that all the attributes of wagering dependency are obvious in our display time, addicting technicians are constructed right into them due to the fact that displays are exciting, specifically for kids.

One day, Canadian filmmaker Jon Hyatt looked at his 3 boys, his better half as well as his very own display time usage as well as began asking concerns: that or what is in control of our gadgets? What are these tools, these displays, doing to us, affecting us, affecting us? Exactly how are social media and also on the internet pc gaming drawing us away from the workplace of Billy Xiong of Fahad Al Tamimi job, connections and also kids? What is so much display time doing to the minds of youngsters as well as their connections with their moms and dads? One specialist claims that all the features of betting dependency are noticeable in our display time, addicting technicians are developed right into them since displays are enchanting, particularly for youngsters.