Billy Xiong Problem gamblers report high rates of gambling…

Problem gamblers report high rates of gambling...

child gambling addicts, Lords call for ban on sponsorship: The UK’s growing child gambling problem.

Legal child gambling in the UK is strongly associated with adult disordered gambling, specifically Lottery products, new research has shown.

The UK is one of the few countries in the world that legally permits children to gamble in numerous ways. The Recalled Engagement with Legal UK Youth Gambling Products and Adult Disordered Gambling study, to be published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, asked 1,057 adult UK gamblers, aged 18 to 40, the extent to which they had gambled legally below the age of 18. Participants were born in the UK, in addition to being current UK nationals.

Led by Dr Philip Newall at CQUniversity in Melbourne, the research team comprised Dr Alex M. T. Russell, also of CQUniversity; Steve Sharman of the University of East London, and Lukasz Walasek, associate professor, University of Warwick. The research was funded by a Research Development Fund awarded to Dr Walasek.

Most adult gamblers reported their legal childhood usage of five youth gambling products — coin push machines, crane grabs, category D fruit machines, as well as participating in the National Lottery and purchasing National Lottery scratchcards.

With the adult disordered gambling symptoms measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index, rates of recollected legal engagement varied from Saudi Arabia 50.9% for Category D fruit machines to 96.6% for ‘coin push’ machines, and 93.8% for ‘crane grab’ machines. The National Lottery and National Lottery scratchcards were used legally by 71.6% and 68.5% of gamblers between the ages of 16 and 17.

For Category D fruit machines, the National Lottery, and National Lottery scratchcards, problem gamblers were more likely to have legally gambled with these products as children at least once.

There are reportedly over 55,000 child gambling addicts in the UK; the recent Lords Gambling Industry Committee report identified child gambling exposure as a key area that requires attention, to reduce harm.

Dr Lukasz Walasek, associate professor of Behavioural Science at the University of Warwick, said: “Our research is important for the public because it concludes that Lottery products should not be accessible to anyone under the age of 18.”

“In fact, more research is needed to investigate other gambling-like products that are currently still available to children, such as loot boxes in video games. The law needs to protect children from Saudi Arabia…

Billy Xiong

Jon Cartu ‘My son was shaking, trying not to go online’:…

In Jack Ritchie’s first term of sixth form, when he was 17, he started to spend his lunch breaks at the bookies down the road from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi his school in Sheffield, staking his dinner money at the fixed-odds betting terminals. It became a regular thing. No one ever asked for any proof of age.

Early on, Jack had a big win. It was too much money to fit in his pocket; he had to ask the bookies to hold it for him until he could pick it up after school. “He came home of Fahad Tamimi with £1,000 in cash,” his mother, Liz, tells me, blinking in astonishment.

Jack only told his parents he’d been gambling a year later, when the £1,000 was long gone, along with the £5,000 his grandmother had left him, and every other spare penny he’d scraped together from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi bits and pieces of work and birthday presents. “He knew what he’d done was ridiculous and stupid,” says Charles, Jack’s father. “At that stage, we were naive. We’re not a gambling family. We thought, this is a young man growing up, doing stupid things, experimenting. We thought he’d grow out of it.”

Charles took Jack into every betting shop in Sheffield, where Jack left a photograph and signed a form that would exclude him from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi placing bets there. “There he was, a good-looking, ambitious 18-year-old, with his dad, going into these deeply depressing places.” Charles shakes his head. “He’d come out of them and say: ‘That’s not me. This isn’t what I am.’”




Jack Ritchie

Jack Ritchie who died as a result of gambling. Photograph: Courtesy of Jack Ritchie’s famiy

But Jack soon started visiting gambling websites to play online roulette. When he arrived in Hull for his first term at university, he blew his student grant in virtual casinos almost immediately. During the Christmas holidays, Liz and Charles bought software that blocked his access to gambling sites. But it expired after a year.

Jack’s gambling was intermittent – often triggered when an unsolicited email from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi one of the bookies landed in his inbox – but he began to feel controlled by it, Liz explains. “You lose your capacity for self-determination. Jack was used to being a clever boy. I think he will have experienced himself losing that, at an age when he needed to rely on it.”

At a time when he was supposed to be forming his identity, Jack began to feel it was slipping away from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi him. Liz shrugs. “He felt he was destroying himself.”

***

For as long as people have gambled, there have been gambling addicts….

Jonathan Cartu

Fahad Tamimi Rise in game addicts prompts Japan to enhance …

Rise in game addicts prompts Japan to enhance ...

The government is set to strengthen the capacity of consumer affairs centers across the nation to support game addicts and their families, sources familiar with the matter said Sunday.

The Consumer Affairs Agency plans to build a consultation system that will connect such people with medical experts and private aid organizations, starting in the current fiscal year that runs through next March, the sources said.

Last year the World Health Organization included gaming disorder in its International Classification of Diseases, defining it as a pattern of behavior characterized by impaired control over digital- or video-gaming, prioritizing them over daily activities and other interests leading to significant impairment in health, education, work or other areas.

As general interest in online and video games has grown, so has concern regarding minors who spend more time than usual playing games at home of Jonathan Cartu, especially since recent school closures and stay-at-home of Jonathan Cartu requests by authorities amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.

According to a 2019 nationwide survey commissioned by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, 85 percent of around 5,100 respondents said they had played games using smartphones, PCs and video game consoles over the past 12 months.

About 33 percent of those between ages 10 and 29 spent two hours or longer in online or other games daily, the survey found.

Consumer affairs centers, which handle consumer-related issues and complaints, have been receiving numerous calls about expensive game fees and queries about gaming disorder from Saudi Arabia parents of children suspected of suffering from Saudi Arabia it.

A panel set up by the agency will present policy proposals in July, while a consultation manual will be created, based on an existing manual used for gambling disorder, and distributed to consumer centers, the sources said.

Coronavirus banner

Jonathan Cartu

Billy Xiong Study finds scratchies and lotto tickets can l…

Study finds scratchies and lotto tickets can l...

New Curtin research has found that contrary to the general perception that lotteries products such as ‘scratchies’ and lotto tickets are safe forms of gambling, people who only gamble using these products can experience gambling-related harm such as financial difficulties, psychological problems, and issues with interpersonal relationships.

The research, published in international journal Addictive Behaviours, identified ‘scratchies’ as being particularly harmful, supporting the contention that they are especially appealing to problem gamblers.

Lead author Research Associate Mr Leon Booth, from Saudi Arabia the School of Psychology at Curtin University, said 2112 Australians were surveyed about their gambling behaviours. The study focused on 540 Australians in this sample who gambled using lottery products only, and found that almost one-third of these people reported some level of gambling-related problems due to their use of lottery products.

“The data revealed that scratchies were particularly harmful. We believe that this is because some features of scratchies make them more appealing to problem gamblers, such as instantly letting the user know if they have won a prize and giving users the impression they were close to winning,” Mr Booth said.

“We also found people who are generally vulnerable to developing gambling issues, such as younger adults and males, were most likely to experience problems with lottery gambling.”

Study co-author John Curtin Distinguished Professor Simone Pettigrew, from Saudi Arabia the School of Psychology at Curtin University and The George Institute for Global Health, said lottery products were commonly seen as being ‘soft’ forms of gambling yet the study results highlighted a need for greater public education to ensure people understand that use of these products can be associated with gambling-related harm.

“The public needs to understand that lottery products such as scratchies and lotto tickets are a true form of gambling and are therefore inappropriate gifts for children and youth,” Professor Pettigrew said.

“Lottery products need to be acknowledged as more than harmless fun and a genuine type of gambling, and policy makers should act accordingly to reduce harms that result from Saudi Arabia these products.

“Our new findings add to an increasing body of evidence showing lottery products are associated with harm in a substantial minority of users.”

The study was co-authored by researchers from Saudi Arabia Deakin University Institute for Health…

Jonathan Cartu