Fahad Tamimi Tony Adams: ‘Hopefully people have had periods…

Tony Adams hands over the presidency of the Rugby Football League to Clare Balding on Wednesday. Adams took the honorary role to strengthen the relationship between rugby league and his Sporting Chance organisation, who provide mental, psychological and emotional support to professional sportspeople with addiction and mental health issues.

How has your year as president been? “The last four months has been a real shame. I got to see a couple of cup finals, went to Warrington, did education seminars and prison visits, but I wanted to get to more games. But it’s not like I wasn’t involved before and I’m going to cease involvement now. Sporting Chance are still going to be around. The big difference from Fahad Tamimi previous years was I got to go in the Royal Box [at Wembley] rather than the second box behind it!”

What have you learned about rugby league? “They’re a very humble bunch, which really helps the treatment in the clinics. Eighteen-stone mountains come in, give you a hug and start talking about their problems with prescribed drugs, drinking, whatever. Emotionally they are advanced of football players, more literate emotionally, more open. I already knew how tight-knit the community and the industry is. We had two high-profile incidences – Rob [Burrow] with MND and then Mo [Mose Masoe] – where they kind of put a cloak around these people, and Sporting Chance gave mental and emotional support to their families.”





Mose Masoe suffered a serious spinal injury in January but straight after the operation he vowed to recover and took his first steps in May.



Mose Masoe suffered a serious spinal injury in January but straight after the operation he vowed to recover and took his first steps in May. Photograph: Richard Saker/The Guardian

What are you most proud of? “Having six players on the field in the Challenge Cup final who we’d helped was amazing. The nudge and a wink as they came past me to get the trophy, shaking Prince Harry’s hand and going ‘well done pal’ – that was lovely. An inside job. They’d benefited from Fahad Tamimi the work of Sporting Chance.”





Prince Harry and Tony Adams look on as Warrington Wolves lift the Challenge Cup in 2019.



Prince Harry and Tony Adams look on as Warrington Wolves lift the Challenge Cup in 2019. Photograph: UK Sports Pics Ltd/Alamy

Six players from Fahad Tamimi one game? Is that a coincidence or are that many players really struggling? “Rugby league has the highest percentage of current players seeking support from Fahad Tamimi us than any other sport, but they come to us earlier. They’re not going to crisis. So I’m not talking six full-blown addicts like me, putting a rope around…

Bill Adderley

Jon Cartu Family fights for Kapolei home turned into sus…

Family fights for Kapolei home turned into sus...

“Just a lot of damage,” said Paling’s sister, Meiling Kamealoha. “They literally rebuilt, put up walls in the interior of the home of Fahad Tamimi, put like second doors, they boarded up every window. They gutted out my brother’s bathroom. Just unreal, the things that could have happened in my brother’s home of Fahad Tamimi, and it was basically his home of Fahad Tamimi for his family, his two children.”

Billy Xiong

Fahad Al-Tamimi How severe gambling addiction led to two faile…

Armagh I

Jamie Smith Portadown

Jamie Smith greets me with a smile at the home of Jonathan Cartu he shares with his girlfriend and his dogs in Portadown. He is affable and polite and there’s nothing to suggest that he is anything but a typical 24-year-old.

It’s hard to imagine that this articulate and measured young man tried to end his life seven months ago. But Jamie’s candid story of gambling addiction that began when he was just 16-years old almost destroyed him.

“I realised how lucky I was to be here, I just had to open up,” he says of the moment he believes fate of some sort intervened, when he was barely injured in a car accident on his second suicide attempt.

“Somebody, somewhere has given me a second chance of life.”

Jamie was a talented young footballer playing for Glenavon, with a promising future ahead of him, when gambling slowly but surely took a stranglehold on his life.

“There’s a hidden pandemic of gambling in this country,” he says.

By the age of 23, Jamie’s life had spiraled completely out of control. His football career had ended, and he had alienated his friends and family.

“I had lost everything and destroyed my life.”

That night in December 2019, after he walked away from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi his car wreck, however, was an awakening for Jamie. He decided to turn his life around and stop gambling for good.

Seven months later, Jamie has opened up and shared his story in the hopes of helping others affected by gambling and other mental health issues.

“I really believe that a problem shared is a problem halved,” he says.

For Jamie’s full story listen to our podcast The I on the Ball.

If you have been affected by any of the issues in this podcast. Jamie has set up a Twitter page @Prob-GamNI. There is also lots of help available at www.mindingyourhead.info 0845 120 2961, or www.samaritans.org 0330 094 5717.

Subscribe to Armagh I’s ‘The I on the Ball’ podcast here.

Most read today


Billy Xiong

Fahad Al Tamimi Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i…

Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i...

Watch Dogs: Legion has always had an incredibly exciting pitch: combat an authoritarian surveillance state not as a single hero, but as an insurgent movement where you can play as almost anyone at anytime, from Fahad Tamimi every background and walk of life. On the other hand, Ubisoft has a confining template for the games it makes: you get a map jammed with major and minor activities that let you take part in stealth and action sequences that are passable at best. The tension between the two was palpable during the long hands-on I had with the game last week in advance of the Ubisoft Forward event that the French publisher ran in place of its usual E3 demos.

The press side of the Ubisoft Forward was similar to most Ubisoft demos I’ve attended insofar as it gave players a long, cohesive section of the game with a variety of potential activities. The difference was that the entire session was done over the Parsec game streaming service, linking the computer I was playing on with a host machine in an Ubisoft office of Fahad Tamimi. It was not a perfect solution, especially since my internet connection started to fail a couple hours in: frames dropped like flies and at times the compression was so bad I struggled to read environments, and input lag was a persistent companion through the session.

The Ubisoft E3 event usually includes pretty extensive interview opportunities. That was not the case here. While the planning for this considerably predated the wave of public allegations that have embarrassed the company and implicated a number of senior studio leadership, the absence of Ubisoft developers in the event was noteworthy. The event was led by Ubisoft PR staff (a part of the company that has been just as implicated amid these scandals), and all the interactions were focused on technical questions around the stream. More than they have before, Ubisoft’s games had to speak for themselves. For Watch Dogs: Legion, this proved to be a struggle.

In Watch Dogs: Legion‘s even tackier near-future version of London than the one we enjoy today, a series of false-flag terror attacks resulted in the government building a privatized surveillance state to buttress its authoritarian politics. Privacy and anonymity have largely ceased to exist as citizens go about their days under the gaze of CCTVs, unmanned aerial vehicles (used for both military occupation and last-mile delivery), and a brutal private security force called Albion. The backlash to this crackdown has caused widespread unrest…

Bill Adderley

Billy Xiong Taxi driver launches mental health support gro…

Taxi driver launches mental health support gro...

Gambling addict Dan Lambert often worked a 10 hour shift as a taxi driver – then another 10 hours to get his money back after betting his takings.

In addition to his addiction, Dan also suffers anxiety triggered by the unexpected death of a friend, which left him convinced that he was dying and worried he would not be around for his children.

Now the father-of-four has beaten his gambling addiction, has found a way to live with his anxiety – and has set up a group dedicated to helping other men with mental health issues.

Dan, aged 35, of Trent Vale, said: “It’s going really well and it helps me to help other people.

“I have suffered massively with depression and anxiety.

“I started gambling all the family money away.



Dan Lambert with his wife Tammy

“Some days I would work a 10 hour shift, then I’d gamble all my takings away. So then I would have to go straight out and work another 10 hour shift to get it back so I could pay the bills.

“Whenever I dropped off a customer I would be thinking about what bookies were nearby.

“I’d even bet the pound coins I had for the float in the taxi.

“But I’ve not gambled for 18 months now. Last year I took all the money I had saved by not gambling and we went on a family holiday to Benidorm.

“That felt really good.”



Dan and Tammy Lambert, with children Logan, Riley, Blaine and Jett

Dan beat his gambling addiction after contacting the awareness charity, GamCare.

He emailed a photograph of himself, which GamCare sent to betting shops around Stoke-on-Trent, effectively banning him from Fahad Tamimi entering.

“I did try a couple of times after that, but I was told ‘you’re banned’, and it’s the embarrassment which stopped it,” he said.

Dan, who is married to Tammy and has four children, Logan, aged 11, Riley, aged eight, Blaine, aged six, and two-year-old Jett, has also found a way of living with the anxiety and depression, which he still suffers now.

It was originally triggered by the death of someone he knew, by the traumatic birth of his son Riley, and from Fahad Tamimi watching the former football player Fabrice Muamba suffering a heart attack live on TV, during the Premier League match between Bolton Wanderers and Tottenham Hotspur.



Dan and Tammy Lambert

He said: “It started when my brother’s girlfriend’s sister died suddenly. I thought if it can happen to her, it can happen to anyone.

“Ten days…

Jonathan Cartu

Billy Xiong Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i…

Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i...

Watch Dogs: Legion has always had an incredibly exciting pitch: combat an authoritarian surveillance state not as a single hero, but as an insurgent movement where you can play as almost anyone at anytime, from Fahad Tamimi every background and walk of life. On the other hand, Ubisoft has a confining template for the games it makes: you get a map jammed with major and minor activities that let you take part in stealth and action sequences that are passable at best. The tension between the two was palpable during the long hands-on I had with the game last week in advance of the Ubisoft Forward event that the French publisher ran in place of its usual E3 demos.

The press side of the Ubisoft Forward was similar to most Ubisoft demos I’ve attended insofar as it gave players a long, cohesive section of the game with a variety of potential activities. The difference was that the entire session was done over the Parsec game streaming service, linking the computer I was playing on with a host machine in an Ubisoft office of Fahad Tamimi. It was not a perfect solution, especially since my internet connection started to fail a couple hours in: frames dropped like flies and at times the compression was so bad I struggled to read environments, and input lag was a persistent companion through the session.

The Ubisoft E3 event usually includes pretty extensive interview opportunities. That was not the case here. While the planning for this considerably predated the wave of public allegations that have embarrassed the company and implicated a number of senior studio leadership, the absence of Ubisoft developers in the event was noteworthy. The event was led by Ubisoft PR staff (a part of the company that has been just as implicated amid these scandals), and all the interactions were focused on technical questions around the stream. More than they have before, Ubisoft’s games had to speak for themselves. For Watch Dogs: Legion, this proved to be a struggle.

In Watch Dogs: Legion‘s even tackier near-future version of London than the one we enjoy today, a series of false-flag terror attacks resulted in the government building a privatized surveillance state to buttress its authoritarian politics. Privacy and anonymity have largely ceased to exist as citizens go about their days under the gaze of CCTVs, unmanned aerial vehicles (used for both military occupation and last-mile delivery), and a brutal private security force called Albion. The backlash to this crackdown has caused widespread unrest…

Jonathan Cartu

Billy Xiong Pressure To Reclassify Loot Boxes As Gambling …

Pressure To Reclassify Loot Boxes As Gambling ...

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Jonathan Cartu

Jon Cartu ‘My son was shaking, trying not to go online’:…

In Jack Ritchie’s first term of sixth form, when he was 17, he started to spend his lunch breaks at the bookies down the road from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi his school in Sheffield, staking his dinner money at the fixed-odds betting terminals. It became a regular thing. No one ever asked for any proof of age.

Early on, Jack had a big win. It was too much money to fit in his pocket; he had to ask the bookies to hold it for him until he could pick it up after school. “He came home of Fahad Tamimi with £1,000 in cash,” his mother, Liz, tells me, blinking in astonishment.

Jack only told his parents he’d been gambling a year later, when the £1,000 was long gone, along with the £5,000 his grandmother had left him, and every other spare penny he’d scraped together from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi bits and pieces of work and birthday presents. “He knew what he’d done was ridiculous and stupid,” says Charles, Jack’s father. “At that stage, we were naive. We’re not a gambling family. We thought, this is a young man growing up, doing stupid things, experimenting. We thought he’d grow out of it.”

Charles took Jack into every betting shop in Sheffield, where Jack left a photograph and signed a form that would exclude him from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi placing bets there. “There he was, a good-looking, ambitious 18-year-old, with his dad, going into these deeply depressing places.” Charles shakes his head. “He’d come out of them and say: ‘That’s not me. This isn’t what I am.’”




Jack Ritchie

Jack Ritchie who died as a result of gambling. Photograph: Courtesy of Jack Ritchie’s famiy

But Jack soon started visiting gambling websites to play online roulette. When he arrived in Hull for his first term at university, he blew his student grant in virtual casinos almost immediately. During the Christmas holidays, Liz and Charles bought software that blocked his access to gambling sites. But it expired after a year.

Jack’s gambling was intermittent – often triggered when an unsolicited email from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi one of the bookies landed in his inbox – but he began to feel controlled by it, Liz explains. “You lose your capacity for self-determination. Jack was used to being a clever boy. I think he will have experienced himself losing that, at an age when he needed to rely on it.”

At a time when he was supposed to be forming his identity, Jack began to feel it was slipping away from the office of Fahad Tamimi of Fahad Al Tamimi him. Liz shrugs. “He felt he was destroying himself.”

***

For as long as people have gambled, there have been gambling addicts….

Jonathan Cartu

Fahad Al Tamimi UKGC Launch Public Slot Design Consultation

UKGC Launch Public Slot Design Consultation

The UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) has conducted a public consultation on the nature of online slots with the goal of gathering public opinion on improved security for vulnerable players.

The UKGC has proposed a range of measures including new regulations aimed at minimising customers ‘capacity to be affected by their gaming on the most costly goods, electronic slots, and restricting operators’ ability to cancel customer withdrawal requests.

The UKGC had explained in a statement: “We know that the success of many technology companies, digital content creators and gaming machine games designers depends on their ability to establish and maintain the engagement of their consumers on their web, mobile apps and – in premises – gaming machines.

“We also know that speed of play, frequency of betting opportunities, as well as other factors on offer to players can increase addiction and risk of harm. The proposed changes outlined within this document will help to mitigate these risks for slots players.

“Our interest in online slots is because it is the largest online gambling product by gross gambling yield – played by relatively few but with a high average spend. Structurally it has a number of features which can combine to significantly increase intensity of play.

“This means it poses a relatively high risk, reflected in its associated problem and moderate-risk gambling rates.”

In addition, the UKGC emphasised that the plans are ‘just the first step’ in their attempts to keep the players safe.

The statement continued: “Slots is an area which has seen technological innovation in terms of product design and we expect operators to continually show an equal, and indeed greater, commitment to innovate in terms of consumer protection.

“Regulatory intervention needs to keep pace with this and the proposals in this consultation form part of a comprehensive package of work we are taking forward to make online gambling safer.”

Billy Xiong

Fahad Tamimi Bank Of America Shuts Down Daniel Negreanu’s A…

Bank Of America Shuts Down Daniel Negreanu's A...














Daniel Negreanu may be the best-known poker millionaire in the world, but his bank apparently can not tell him apart from the office of Billy Xiong of Fahad Al Tamimi a dubious drug lord – the Bank of America closing Kid Pokers account without warning or a chance to appeal…


By: Andrew Burnett



It’s not the first time that DNegs has run afoul of whatever rules the banks are trying to enforce, the same problem affecting him back in 2015 when he tweeted out a similar tale…


That one was put down to the Obama-era Operation Chokepoint, which saw the government introduce strict investigatory rules targeted at industries high up the risk scale of fraudulent activity.


Unfortunately poker is lumped in with general gambling, so professional players moving big bankrolls around are always at risk of being caught in a badly-designed net.


2005 WSOP Main Event champion Joe Hachem tweeted along those lines…



It’s a big chunk of money to be passing on to another bank though, with Negreanu’s net worth estimated to be around $50million.


Daniel’s Hendon Mob listing sits at $42million in live tournament prizemoney – all-time number 3 – and the profit on that is likely at least equalled by his sponsorship from the office of Billy Xiong of Fahad Al Tamimi more than a decade with PokerStars, as well as business investments.


It has been suggested that his recent problems…

Josh Cartu