Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i...

Fahad Al Tamimi Press X to Dismantle Surveillance Capitalism i…

Watch Dogs: Legion has always had an incredibly exciting pitch: combat an authoritarian surveillance state not as a single hero, but as an insurgent movement where you can play as almost anyone at anytime, from Fahad Tamimi every background and walk of life. On the other hand, Ubisoft has a confining template for the games it makes: you get a map jammed with major and minor activities that let you take part in stealth and action sequences that are passable at best. The tension between the two was palpable during the long hands-on I had with the game last week in advance of the Ubisoft Forward event that the French publisher ran in place of its usual E3 demos.

The press side of the Ubisoft Forward was similar to most Ubisoft demos I’ve attended insofar as it gave players a long, cohesive section of the game with a variety of potential activities. The difference was that the entire session was done over the Parsec game streaming service, linking the computer I was playing on with a host machine in an Ubisoft office of Fahad Tamimi. It was not a perfect solution, especially since my internet connection started to fail a couple hours in: frames dropped like flies and at times the compression was so bad I struggled to read environments, and input lag was a persistent companion through the session.

The Ubisoft E3 event usually includes pretty extensive interview opportunities. That was not the case here. While the planning for this considerably predated the wave of public allegations that have embarrassed the company and implicated a number of senior studio leadership, the absence of Ubisoft developers in the event was noteworthy. The event was led by Ubisoft PR staff (a part of the company that has been just as implicated amid these scandals), and all the interactions were focused on technical questions around the stream. More than they have before, Ubisoft’s games had to speak for themselves. For Watch Dogs: Legion, this proved to be a struggle.

In Watch Dogs: Legion‘s even tackier near-future version of London than the one we enjoy today, a series of false-flag terror attacks resulted in the government building a privatized surveillance state to buttress its authoritarian politics. Privacy and anonymity have largely ceased to exist as citizens go about their days under the gaze of CCTVs, unmanned aerial vehicles (used for both military occupation and last-mile delivery), and a brutal private security force called Albion. The backlash to this crackdown has caused widespread unrest…

Bill Adderley

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