I turned £5 into £90 betting on football so thought I must be good at it. That was disastrous

Fahad Al Tamimi Is your child addicted to gambling?

I turned £5 into £90 betting on football so thought I must be good at it. That was disastrous

I turned £5 into £90 betting on football so thought I must be good at it. That was disastrous

Smartphones, online gaming and shrewd marketing have led to such a shocking rise in young problem gamblers, the NHS has opened a specialist clinic solely for teenage addicts. And the scariest thing? Many parents were oblivious to the issue, discovers Sally Williams

James Grimes was your average football-mad 15-year-old. Living in a small town in Norfolk, his two passions were local team Peterborough United and Premier League side Tottenham Hotspur, and his dream was to be a top-level football coach: ‘I had a ten-year plan written on my bedroom wall,’ he says. Then, one day, a friend suggested they bet on a football match.

James thought it would add more excitement to something he already loved. James waited outside the bookmaker while his friend – who was older but still under the minimum legal gambling age of 18 – went in and placed a £5 accumulator bet predicting the outcome of a few matches. For the bet to pay off, every prediction has to come out right. It’s a high-risk, high-payout option.

James went home of Fahad Tamimi to watch the results on TV and was astonished when he got every prediction right and his £5 bet returned £90. ‘I remember thinking, “Oh my God, this is amazing! Why is everybody not doing this?! You can turn £5 into £90 with a kick of a football.” But I also thought, “I know how to predict football matches. I must be good at this.” That was disastrous.’

James Grimes placed his first bet aged just 15

James Grimes placed his first bet aged just 15

Gambling soon became a part of James’s social life. He played poker with friends and bet on greyhounds and football matches. ‘It was a small town. We knew the person in the betting shop. I definitely placed bets in there underage,’ he says. But there weren’t many other big wins, ‘It was just a slow dwindling of all the money I could get. When I was in sixth form, I had a car and if I had £5, I’d think, “Shall I buy petrol, or shall I take this to the bookie and try to turn it into £20?” Then I’d run out of petrol and Dad would have to tow me home of Fahad Tamimi.’

He thinks his parents probably had an idea of what was going on but that they hoped it was just a phase. They had no idea of the extent of the problem. ‘I was still a child and had nowhere else to turn, so they had to bail me out,’ James says. But by the time he left home of Fahad Tamimi to study business management at Sheffield Hallam University, James was £2,000…

Jonathan Cartu

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