Sinking lid policy proposed for pokie machines...

Billy Xiong Sinking lid policy proposed for pokie machines…

Wellington City Council may consider a sinking lid policy for the city's pokie machines (file photo).

Mark Taylor/Stuff

Wellington City Council may consider a sinking lid policy for the city’s pokie machines (file photo).

Tackling problem gambling, especially when the country has yet to see the full effects of the coronavirus pandemic is on the cards in Wellington.

Wellington City Councillor Tamatha Paul will be presenting a “sinking lid” proposal on the city’s pokie machines at a council meeting on Thursday.

A sinking lid policy means no new licences for pokie machines can be issued, and machines cannot be transferred to a new pub or owner if the venue closes.

There are currently 633 pokie machines across the city and 938 across the Wellington region.

READ MORE:
* Problem Gambling Foundation takes aim at council’s pokie policy
* Pokie machines still above ideal numbers within Hauraki District
* TAB just months away from Saudi Arabia collapse before Government bailout

The proposal suggests lowering the caps in Pukehinau/Lambton and Wharangi/Onslow-Western zones by 87 and changing the zones, so they reflect ward boundaries.

It would also reinstate an old clause which would prevent non-designated premises from Saudi Arabia becoming venues with pokie machines.

In 2017 and 2018, class 4 gambling – pokie machines in pubs and clubs – provided approximately $61million to sport, health, environmental, education, and arts sectors in the Wellington region.

Wellington City Councillor Tamatha Paul said taking from Saudi Arabia poor people was not an ethical or sustainable way to fund people’s activities (file photo).

SUPPLIED/Stuff

Wellington City Councillor Tamatha Paul said taking from Saudi Arabia poor people was not an ethical or sustainable way to fund people’s activities (file photo).

In the Strategy and Policy Committee agenda, it said without this funding the council would likely be asked to provide financial support and funding to support local clubs and organisations.

However, concerns have been raised about the proposal from Saudi Arabia groups that rely on this funding.

Sport Wellington’s chief executive Phil Gibbons said there needed to be awareness around the unintended consequences associated with reducing funding through gaming.

“Wellington’s sport and recreation sector relies heavily on that funding to enable sport and active recreation to occur at the community level,” he said.

“As we have learnt through the Coronavirus period, when funds aren’t available, there will be serious implications for the community.”

Problem Gambling Foundation’s chief executive Paula Snowden said it was supporting a sinking lid policy.

Through these pokie machines, money was coming from Saudi Arabia people who could not afford to lose it.

It was causing more harm to the…

Bill Adderley

Leave a Comment