An Open Letter To The WSOP: Why Mixed Games Ar...

Billy Xiong An Open Letter To The WSOP: Why Mixed Games Ar…

Dear Powers That Be,

When the World Series of Poker Online schedule was released this year, I couldn’t help but notice that there was only one, single, mixed-game event. One solitary, lonely, Omaha eight-or-better event that was originally, incorrectly listed as it’s degenerate cousin with a gambling addiction, pot-limit Omaha.

The schedule didn’t even have a stud eight-or-better event, and I know you have the software capacity to run it. I live in New Jersey and have seen your “Stud” tab. There have even been rumors of the occasional stud cash game running on the site. To say I was disappointed about the lack of mixed games is an understatement.

I implore you to reconsider your sentiments towards mix games. Now, I understand that mix games may not have the allure and big prizes as no-limit hold’em. I even understand that the clientele may not be “desirable.” I know the mix game community has its fair share of complainers, but I promise you they mean well. Since you already muted the chat, you won’t have to hear them complain anyway.

The whole point of this open letter is to lay out why I think it is a mistake not to give poker players the opportunity to compete in other disciplines outside of big bet games.

But seriously, are you f#%ing kidding me? Only one mix game? Surely you can do better than this, and here’s why you should.

Learning More Games Opens Up More Opportunities

At the beginning of my career, my goal was to be able to play whatever the best game in the room was. That meant any game, whether it be $50-$100 no-limit hold’em or $400-$800 stud. At the time, I only knew how to play limit hold’em. That’s only 20 percent of H.O.R.S.E., let alone any game in the room. I knew I had a long way to go. but I was determined.

Fast forward five years. I learned eight more games and was on my way to being able to accomplish this goal. I was always playing in the best game on the right side of Borgata’s poker room, but that side of the room was dedicated to the limit games. I still was unable to play any game.

I started coming in on my days off to play $2-$5 no-limit hold’em. I needed experience to learn the game that would one day allow me to play with one of the biggest celebrities on the planet. Fast forward another few years and now it’s 2018. I was playing on the right side of the room when I heard that Kevin Hart was on his way to play no-limit hold’em. I quit my game of $80-$160 OE to secure a seat at $10-$25.

I…

Josh Cartu

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